University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
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New Students


Visas

It is very important to enter the United States with the proper visa. You must apply for an entry visa sticker to be placed in your passport so that you can enter the U.S. with student status. Please note:

  • Canadian citizens do not require an entry visa (more information below).
  • If you are currently in the U.S. in F-1 or J-1 visa status and plan to remain in that same visa status, you must transfer your F-1 or J-1 SEVIS record to the University of Minnesota. See the Visa Transfers page for instructions.

1. Determine the type of entry visa you need

Most University of Minnesota students should apply for an F-1 student visa. For some students, the J-1 visa is more appropriate. J-1 students are usually in formal exchange programs or they will receive most or all of their funding from their home government, a U.S. government agency, or in some cases, the University of Minnesota.

If you received an “I-20” document from the University, you will apply for an F-1 visa. If you received a “DS-2019” document from the University or another U.S. agency, you will apply for a J-1 student visa. If you think you received the wrong type of document, please contact ISSS.

Caution: Do NOT enter the U.S. in visitor status (B1/B2 or Visa Waiver) or in F-2 (dependent of F-1) status. Individuals with these immigration statuses are not eligible to register for an academic course of study. If you have questions about any other visa types, contact ISSS.

2. Pay the SEVIS fee

New students must pay the SEVIS fee before applying for an entry visa or entering the United States. This fee is charged by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and is not administered by the University. Keep in mind that you will not be able to pay the fee until you have your I-20 or DS-2019 in your possession. For more information about how to pay the fee, visit www.fmjfee.com.

3. Locate the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate in your home country

Embassy and consulate information, including locations and coument requirments, is available on-line at www.embassyworld.com.

4. Schedule your visa interview

Your local embassy or consulate will have specific instructions for scheduling an appointment. Waiting times for an appointment can be lengthy (up to several weeks or longer), especially during the busy summer months. Schedule your appointment as soon as possible after receiving your visa documents.

5. Prepare documents for your visa appointment

All visa applicants must provide the following documents to the U.S. embassy or consulate at the time of the application:

  • Valid passport
  • I-20 or DS-2019 document
  • Admission letter (or print out of electronic admission notification)
  • Documented proof of financial support for at least one year (scholarship or assistantship letter, bank statement, etc.)
  • Recepit of SEVIS fee payment
  • Visa application forms (available from the U.S. embassy/consulate)
  • Any other documents requested by the embassy/consulate

6. Practice for your visa interview:

When applying for your non-immigrant visa, the U.S. Consular Officer interviewing you will assume that you plan to immigrate permanently to the U.S unless you prove otherwise. During the interview you will need to prove that you will only study temporarily in the U.S. and will return home after your studies are complete. Answer all questions truthfully but only provided information related to the question asked. Be prepared to answer the following confidently and clearly in English:

  • Your area of study
  • Your reason for wanting to study in the U.S.
  • Proof of sufficient funds and how your funds are able to cover all of your expenses for a minimum of one year
  • Your good reasons for returning home after you complete your studies. You must be able to provide documentary evidence where possible of the strong ties you have to your country. It could include having all of your family in your country, having a job offer awaiting you when you return, or proof of property ownership. Other facts to emphasize are specific future educational, employment or career goals that will be carried out in your home country. Do not emphasize relatives who live or study in the U.S.

We recommend practicing your visa interview with a family member or friend!

Canadian Citizens

Canadian citizens are eligible to enter the United States without obtaining an entry visa in their passport. However, Canadian citizens must obtain an I-20 or DS-2019 and pay the SEVIS fee before entering the U.S. Upon entry, you must present to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer your passport, I-20 or DS-2019, proof of financial support for at least one year, your admission letter, and receipt of SEVIS fee payment.

Canadian Landed Immigrants: You are required to obtain a visa. See your nearest American Consulate for more information.

Advanced Tuition Payments

Occasionally, an embassy or consulate requires that you make an advanced payment to the University for your tuition. Please read the information about advanced tuition payments in the Expenses section.

Importance of Name Consistency

To avoid problems or delays in obtaining your visa and entering the United States, ensure that all of your immigration documents reflect the same name, exactly as it appears in your passport. Do not use hyphens or non-English letters or markings. Spaces can be used between multiple names. Single names must use the U.S. Department of State visa format – put in Surname/Primary Name field and leave the Given Name field empty. Do not use “nicknames” or shortened names on any of your documents, including your passport, I-20 or DS-2019, entry visa, or any additional documents that you acquire after your arrival in the U.S.

Deciding between multiple schools

You MUST attend the school that is indicated on the I-20 or DS-2019 that you use for your visa application. If you received more than one visa document, you should NOT apply for a visa until you are certain which school you would like to attend. Once you have made a decision and applied for your visa, return any unused I-20s or DS-2019s to the school or agency that issued them to you.

Questions about your documents

If you have any questions about your DS-2019 or I-20, or if you need to correct or change any information on your documents, contact the office or agency that issued it:

I-20s are issued by the following University of Minnesota offices:

  • Undergraduate Students: isss@umn.edu
  • Graduate School Students: gsquest@umn.edu
  • Professional Degree Students: Your college admissions office

DS-2019s

  • Issued by the University of Minnesota: isss@umn.edu
  • Issued by another agency: Agency’s contact person

Major: The major field of study listed on your admission letter and the major field of study listed on your I-20 may not appear exactly the same. This is due to a coding discrepancy and is not a cause for concern.

Technology Alert List

T.A.L. was created by the U.S. government as a guideline for consular offices to use in reviewing visa applications. The purpose is to prevent the export of goods, technology, or sensitive information.  The list of T.A.L. specific fields is classified however a general overview of categories is available at the Department of State website.

Visa Denials

If your visa is denied, ask the consular officials to provide you with a written explanation of the denial, and contact ISSS for assistance. Email isss@umn.edu and write “Visa Denial” in the subject line.

Security clearance checks

Many visa applicants are subject to additional security clearance checks that will delay the issuance of your visa by one to two months. This is NOT a denial. Most applicants who are subject to security clearance will eventually receive the visa. You cannot prevent a security clearance, nor can ISSS or your department intervene to speed up the process.

GPS